Poás Volcano Travel Guide

Poás is one of Costa Rica´s most active volcanoes, and one of its most frequently visited and prominent ones.

Read More…

Click to open a larger map

Icon
Download

Poás Volcano Travel Guide 3.82 MB 1 downloads

All the info to prepare your trip to Poás Volcano. How to get in, maps, activities...
Wednesday 27°CThursday 25°CFriday 25°CSaturday 22°CSunday 26°C

Considered by most to be one of the most breathtaking sites in the entire country, the Poas Volcano sits high above 14,000 acres of various habitats and life zones which make up Poas Volcano National ark (Parque Nacional Volcan Poas).

Rising up to 2,708 m, Poas remains one of Costa Rica’s largest and most active volcanoes. This fact alone is enough to attract thousands of visitors per year. One of the attractive features about Poás is that you can get all the way to the edge of the crater. The volcano is located in the Central Volcanic Conservation Area located in the Alajuela Province near the Pacific coast of Costa Rica, which encompasses the area around the Poás Volcano.

The main crater is 950 feet (290 m) deep and is quite active with frequent small geyser and lava eruptions, however the last major eruptions were during 1952-54. Two more craters make up parts of the park, the extinct Von Frantzuis crater and the Botos crater. Botos is a beautiful cold, green water crater lake with a diameter of 1,200 feet (370 m).

The Botos crater has not erupted for about 7,500 years. Well-marked trails will take you to see the two inactive craters. The park is frequently closed to visitors because of sulphuric gas emissions. There are a number of indications that the volcano is slowly building towards a new eruption over the last decade.

Go top

CRATER LAKES

There are two crater lakes near the summit. The northern lake is known as the Laguna Caliente (“hot lagoon”) and is located at a height of 2,300 m in a crater approximately 1.7 km wide and 290–300 m deep. It is one of the world’s most acidic lakes. The acidity varies after rain and changes in volcanic activity, sometimes reaching a pH of almost 0; consequently, it supports little or no aquatic life. The bottom of this lake is covered with a layer of liquid sulphur. Acid gases create acid rain and acid fog, causing damage to surrounding ecosystems and often irritation of eyes and lungs.

Lake Botos, the southern lake, fills an inactive crater, which last erupted in 7500 BC. It is cold and clear, and is surrounded by a cloud forest located within the Poás Volcano National Park.

ERUPTIVE HISTORY

Poás was near the epicenter of a 6.1-magnitude earthquake in January 2009 that killed at least forty people and affected Fraijanes, Vara Blanca, Cinchona (the most affected area), the capital San José, and the Central Valley region of Costa Rica. There was also eruptive activity in 2009 involving minor phreatic eruptions and landslides within the northern active crater. Poás eruptions often include geyser-like ejections of crater-lake water. On February 25, 2014, a webcam from the Volcanological and Seismological Observatory of Costa Rica (OVSICORI) captured the moment a dark cloud exploded about 1,000 feet in the air from a massive crater of the Poás Volcano.

Go top

Poás Volcano National Park obviously has a volcano but it’s also one of the easiest and most accessible spots to see cloud forest around San Jose. It has erupted 39 times since 1828.

Travel and tourism at the Poás Volcano. How to get in, maps, activities to do, where to eat and sleep. Download the Free Poás Volcano Travel Guide.


Search Hotels

Destination
Check-in date
Check-out date


Michel Piccaya

About

As a freelance travel photographer, Michel Piccaya has been on the road worldwide for more than 20 years, exploring the most incredible itineraries. He’s currently based in Brussels however never stays at home for a long time !

Leave a reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Go top